• House Manager Adam Schiff sums up the Democrat’s case in 8 1/2 minutes

    CLICK ON IMAGE BELOW TO VIEW THIS CLIP FROM

    JANUARY 23rd 

    In Stirring Closing Speech, Schiff Goes to the Heart of Why Trump Should Be Removed
    “Right matters and the truth matters. Otherwise, we are lost.”
  • History made: Cooper appoints NC’s first Black woman as Chief Justice

    Excerpted from two separate stories from
    NC Policy Watch
    Cheri Beasley made history this week when Gov. Roy Cooper announced that she would become the state’s first Black woman to be chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. Beasley stood between the Governor and her husband, Curtis, as she spoke about the significance of her appointment, particularly during Black History Month. “This court this year is coming right at 200 years, and this is certainly not the North Carolina of 200 years ago,” she said. “And so I’m excited about the fact that North Carolina has moved forward, that we do have a diverse court, and it’s so important that people feel good and have a confidence in the work that we do, and so I’m excited about continuing to do that work.”
    Beasley has been appointed to the judiciary by three different Governors – the District Court bench in Cumberland County by Gov. Jim Hunt, the Supreme Court by Gov. Bev Perdue and now the Chief Justice post by Cooper. She also served on the state Court of Appeals, where she was the first Black woman to be elected to statewide office without having first been appointed by a Governor.
    “I believe that Justice Beasley is a tremendous selection for our Supreme Court,” said Justice Mike Morgan, who was elected in 2016. “She is passionate about justice for everyone, not just in this court but in cases heard throughout the state.” Morgan said he, like Beasley, hopes her appointment shows how far the state has come on race. “North Carolina’s strength is in its diversity of people,” he said. “I believe that this is another indication that North Carolina is continuing to progress.”
    In its history, 95 justices have served on the Supreme Court. Of that number, only seven have been people of color and only one of those seven – Henry Frye – has served as long as a full term of eight years.
    It’s not expected that much will change under her leadership. The other justices, she said, are always committed to working hard and to properly resolving cases in a timely fashion.
    The Chief Justice, though, is responsible for much more than just the work of the high court. They are the leader of the entire judicial system with broad responsibilities, including numerous administrative and appointment duties, designating the Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals, creating Superior Court sessions and assigning those judges and choosing three-judge panels that hear constitutional challenges.
    The Republican Party criticized Cooper for not choosing Senior Associate Justice Paul Newby as Chief Justice. They charged the Governor with putting politics first. Similarly, Newby released a statement after her appointment that he was upset and that Cooper placed “raw partisan politics over a non-partisan judiciary.”
    Beasley does not believe partisan politics has any place in the work justices perform on the Supreme Court.
    Beasley’s appointment to serve as Chief Justice leaves her current position vacant, and Cooper will also appoint someone to fill it. His decision, which he expects to announce in the next week or so, could change the court to a 6-1 Democratic majority. He’s been asked if he feels any obligation to appoint a Republican to keep a balance on the bench, but said he will appoint the best person for the job, whomever that may be.
    Beasley has been invested in working with kids and mentoring and training young lawyers, which she hopes to continue as Chief Justice. She wants people to see how big their possibilities in life can be. “That’s why I think it’s so important and incumbent on the rest of us to help young people to see that the possibilities really are endless, and that so much in our future, and really in our present, depends on their willingness to see that they really are very capable and will offer the hope for North Carolina,” she added.
  • Around the State of North Carolina

  • Two more failing grades for the State of North Carolina

  • Editor’s Note: Following are some excerpts from an extensive article published in New York Magazine. A link to the full article is provided following the article.
    The unfolding of the Russia scandal has been like walking into a dark cavern. Every step reveals that the cave runs deeper than we thought, and after each one, as we wonder how far it goes, our imaginations are circumscribed by the steps we have already taken. The cavern might go just a little farther, we presume, but probably not much farther. But what if that’s wrong? What if we’re still standing closer to the mouth of the cave than the end? What is missing from our imagination is the unlikely but possible outcome on the other end: that this is all much worse than we suspect.Suppose we are currently making the same mistake we made at the outset of this drama — suppose the dark crevices of the Russia scandal run not just a little deeper but a lot deeper. If that’s true, we are in the midst of a scandal unprecedented in American history, a subversion of the integrity of the presidency.
    It would be dangerous not to consider the possibility that the summit is less a negotiation between two heads of state than a meeting between a Russian-intelligence asset and his handler.
    • How do you even think about the small but real chance that the president of the United States has been influenced or compromised by a hostile foreign power for decades?
    • The combination of [Trump’s] penchant for compromising behavior, a willingness to work closely with criminals, and a desire to protect aspects of his privacy makes him the ideal blackmail target.
    • It is not difficult to imagine that Russia quickly had something on Trump, from either exploits during his 1987 visit or any subsequent embarrassing behavior KGB assets might have uncovered. But the other leverage Russia enjoyed over Trump for at least 15 years is indisputable — in fact, his family has admitted to it multiple times. After a series of financial reversals and his brazen abuse of bankruptcy laws, Trump found it impossible to borrow from American banks and grew heavily reliant on unconventional sources of capital. Russian cash proved his salvation. From 2003 to 2017, people from the former USSR made 86 all-cash purchases — a red flag of potential money laundering — of Trump properties, totaling $109 million.  “We don’t rely on American banks. We have all the funding we need out of Russia,” boasted Eric Trump in 2014.
    • This much was clear in March 2016: The person [Paul Manafort] who managed the campaign of a pro-Russian candidate in Ukraine was now also managing the campaign of a pro-Russian candidate in the United States. And Trump’s campaign certainly looked like the same play Putin had run many times before…
    • Contrary to Trump’s recent efforts to depict his relationship with Manafort as distant and short-lived, the two continued to speak regularly even after the inauguration. We know this because U.S. investigators had convinced a FISA judge to wiretap Manafort’s phone.
    • One way to make sense of his behavior is the possibility that Manafort is keeping his mouth shut because he’s afraid of being killed. That speculation might sound hyperbolic, but there is plenty of evidence to support it.  Russia murders people routinely, at home and abroad. In the nine months after Trump’s election, nine Russian officials were murdered or died mysteriously.
    • Now that he’s in office, Trump’s ties to Russia have attracted close scrutiny, and he has found his room to maneuver with Putin sharply constrained by his party. In early 2017, Congress passed sanctions to retaliate against Russia’s election attack. Trump lobbied to weaken them, and when they passed by vetoproof supermajorities, he was reportedly “apoplectic” and took four days to agree to sign the bill even knowing he couldn’t block it. After their passage, Trump has failed to enforce the sanctions as directed.
    • In a Republican meeting a month before Trump clinched the 2016 nomination, the recording of which later leaked, House Speaker Paul Ryan mused about how Russia “hacked the DNC … and, like, delivered it to who?” House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy replied, “There’s two people I think Putin pays: [Dana]Rohrabacher [R-Representative] and Trump.” When others laughed, he added, “Swear to God.”
    • Trump barely puts much effort into predicting a clean bill of health anymore. He acts like a man with a great deal to hide: declining to testify, dangling pardons to keep witnesses from incriminating him, publicly chastising his attorney general for not quashing the whole investigation, and endorsing Russia’s preposterous claims that it had nothing to do with the election at all.
    • Like many of the suspicious facts surrounding Trump’s relations with Russia, it was possible to construct a semi-innocent defense. Maybe he just likes to brag about what he knows. Maybe he’s just too doddering to remember what’s a secret. And as often happens, these unwieldy explanations gained general acceptance. It seemed just too crazy to consider the alternative: It was all exactly what it appeared to be.
    The full article can be read HERE, where the following “collusion chart” can be seen in more detail.